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Version Date Comment
Current Version (v. 12) Jan 07, 2015 07:22 Bogdan Szlachcic
v. 11 Jul 25, 2014 05:20 David Modderman:
Added link to module labels indicating unused jack on FXS module.
v. 10 Jul 08, 2014 10:47 David Modderman:
Added description about applying RF module labels to the bottom of the enclosure.
v. 9 Mar 04, 2014 10:26 Mark Recoskie
v. 8 Dec 06, 2013 10:59 David Modderman:
Added specs for miniPCIe UMTS and LTE modules
v. 7 Nov 29, 2013 09:48 David Modderman:
Added miniPCIe antenna connection instructions.
v. 6 Aug 23, 2013 05:00 David Modderman:
Migrated to Confluence 5.3
v. 5 Aug 23, 2013 05:00 David Modderman:
Added warning about re-installing bottom panel to the same unit it is removed from.
v. 4 Jun 20, 2013 04:35 David Modderman
v. 3 Jun 19, 2013 10:21 Joanna Hauser
v. 2 Jun 12, 2013 10:04 David Modderman:
Minor Corrections to spelling, grammar, etc
v. 1 Jun 11, 2013 12:23 David Modderman:
Initial Release

 

1. Overview

The appliance is a flexible, self-contained platform for voice processing systems.  It is designed to support six types of line interface expansion modules which are: a 4 port FXS/Station module, a 4 port FXO/Trunk (plus Power Failure Transfer port), a 2 port BRI module, a 4 port BRI module, a 2 port GSM module, and a 4 port GSM module.  There are also two full size miniPCIe expansion slots available.  In order to support line interface expansion modules a proprietary FPGA/DSP module is required in one of the miniPCIe slots.  This module provides an interface to the line interface expansion modules as well it optionally provide up to two DSPs for extra signal processing functions.  If no line interface expansion modules are needed then the FPGA/DSP module is not required and both miniPCIe slots are available for other uses.  Echo cancellation and G.729 codec transcoding can be performed on the DSPs on the optional FPGA/DSP module. All other signal processing functions such as conferencing, audio playback/record are performed on the host processor.  

1.1. Interfaces

The PIKA WARP V3 Appliance provides the following interfaces:

  • Two 10/100/1000BaseT network ports
  • Up to a total of two line interface expansion modules of the following types:
    • 4 port FXS/Station module
    • 4 port FXO/Trunk (plus power failure transfer port ) module
    • 2 port BRI module
    • 4 port BRI module
    • 2 port GSM module
    • 4 port GSM module
  • Two full size miniPCIe expansion slots (if line interface expansion modules are installed, one miniPCIe slot is required for an FPGA/DSP module)
  • Audio Line-In and Line-Out ports
  • External USB 2.0 port
  • Two Internal USB 2.0 ports (header cables required)
  • External eSATA port
  • Internal SATA port
  • Internal SD flash card socket
  • LCD panel
  • Front panel proximity button
  • Reset button
  • Internal RS-232 COM port

 

2. Regulatory Information

2.1. Industry Canada (IC) 

Equipment Attachment Limitations 

 

NOTICE: The Industry Canada marking identifies certified equipment. This certification means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network protective and operational safety requirements. The department does not guarantee that the equipment will operate to the user's satisfaction. 

 

Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to connect to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed using an acceptable connection method. The customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions might not prevent degradation of service in some situations. 

 

Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to request the user to disconnect the equipment. 

 

For their own protection, users should ensure that the electrical ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural areas. 

 

Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but should contact the appropriate electrical inspection authority, or electrician, as appropriate. 

 

2.2. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) 

This section contains information applicable to system integrators, to ensure that the use of the appliance complies with FCC part 68. 

 

  1. The appliance must be mounted into the final assembly so it is isolated from exposure to any hazardous voltages with the assembly. Adequate separation and restraint of cables and cords must be provided. 
  2. The TIP/RING leads from the appliance must be wired to the telephone lines in wiring that carries no other circuitry than that specifically allowed in FCC Part 68 rules. Any board traces carrying TIP/RING leads should have sufficient spacing to avoid surge breakdown. 

Consumer Information 

The following information applies to consumers, and should be included by system integrators in their customer documentation. 

 

  1. The appliance complies with Part 15 and Part 68 of the FCC rules. It is verified to comply with the limits for Class A Digital Device pursuant to Part 15 of FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial, industrial or business environment. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense. The label on the bottom of the PIKA Appliance contains the FCC registration number and REN for this equipment. If requested, provide this information to your telephone company.
  2. The REN is useful to determine the number of devices you may connect to your telephone line and still have all of those devices ring when your number is called. In most, but not all areas, the sum of the RENs of all devices should not exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number of devices you may connect to your line, as determined by the REN, you should contact your local telephone company to determine the maximum REN for your calling area.
  3. While the appliance conforms to the applicable telecommunications network regulations, if a malfunction occurs, it may cause harm to the telephone network. In this case, the telephone company may discontinue your service temporarily. 
  4. Your telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment, operations, or procedures that could affect the proper operation of your equipment. 
  5. If you experience trouble with the appliance, please contact PIKA Technologies for repair/warranty information (see Contacting PIKA Technologies). The telephone company may ask you to disconnect this equipment from the network until the problem has been corrected or you are sure the equipment in not malfunctioning. 
  6. The appliance may not be used on coin service provided by the telephone company. Connection to a party line is subject to state tariffs. Contact your state public utility company or corporation commission for information.

 

2.3. European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) 

TBR 21: 1998, Clause 4.8.1 stipulates restrictions on equipment with an automatic seizing and dialing function. 

TBR 21: 1998, Clause 4.8.3 stipulates restrictions on equipment with automatic repeated call attempt ability. 

TBR 21: 1998, Clause 4.7.3 stipulates limitations of sending levels for transmission signals. 

The appliance may be dependent on a third party application for the above clauses and therefore compliance with these requirements cannot be guaranteed. 

PIKA Technologies hereby declares this product is not intended for connection to the public telephone network unless all aspects of compliance are addressed.

 

2.4. Compliance

The appliance is certified compliant for use in the United States, Canada, and European Union countries. The following tables list approval information for EMC/EMI, Telecom, Radio, and Safety standards. Testing for all regulatory disciplines was performed at the Nemko product certification and compliance test facility. The tables list each country or region, its approval standard, registered approval numbers (if any), and a short description of the approval standard. 

 

The term self-declared indicates that the board was tested by a third-party test facility, but does not require an official approval number by a country or region's approval standard authority. For the TBR21 Telecom specification, testing was performed by an in-house test facility. 

 

 

 

EMC/EMI

EMC/EMI standards govern the amount of electromagnetic interference and immunity of electrical devices. The following table lists the EMC/EMI approval information for the appliance. 

 

Country / Region 
Approval Standard 
Approval Number 
Approval Description 
United States 
FCC 47 CFR Part 15, Subpart B, Class A
Self-declared 
Rules for EMC/EMI emissions 
Canada 
ICES-003 Issue 5, Class A
Self-declared 
Rules for EMC/EMI emissions 
Europe 
EN55022: 2010, Class A
Self-declared 
Limits and measurement of EM Emissions 
EuropeEN 61000 3-2: 2006 +A1 +A2 and EN 61000 3-3:2008Self-declared 
Limits and measurement of EM Emissions 
Europe 
EN55024: 2010
Self-declared 
Limits and measurement of EM Immunity 

  

 

Telecom

Telecom standards govern the necessary electrical signals and protocols of telecommunications devices. The following table lists the Telecom approval information for the Analog Trunk/FXO board. 

 

Country / Region 
Approval Standard 
Approval Number 
Approval Description 
United States 
TIA-968-A  
6PRIS01B9900910 
Rules for registration of telephone equipment 
Canada 
CS-03 Issue 9 
1689A-9900910 
Standard for terminal Equipment connected to wireline facilities 

 

 

Radio
  

 

Country / Region 
Approval Standard 
Approval Number 
Approval Description 
 EuropeEN 301 511 V9.0.2 (2003-03)Self-declared Harmonized EN for mobile stations in the GSM 900 and GSM1800 bands
 United StatesFCC Part 22 Subpart D, Subpart HSelf-declared Cellular radiotelephone service.  Personal communications services.
Canada 
RSS-132 Issue 2, RSS-133 Issue 5
Self-declared 
Cellular radiotelephone service.  Personal communications services.

 

 
Safety

Safety standards govern the human safety of all electrical devices. The following table lists the safety approval information for the appliance. 

 

Country / Region 
Approval Standard 
Approval Number 
Approval Description 
United States / Canada 
CSA C22.2 No. 950 NRTL/C 
2612567
Safety standard for IT and telecom equipment 
Europe 
EN60950 
Self-declared 
Safety of IT and electrical business equipment 

 

 RoHS

The appliance and modules are all 2011/65/EU compliant.

 

3. Appliance Description

The following figure is a high-level functional diagram of the WARP V3 Appliance:

 

 

 

Power

The power jack on the back of the unit is for connecting a 12Vdc, 2000mA (24W) regulated power supply with a 5.5mm/2.1mm positive center barrel jack.  A 'zip-tie' may be used to secure the power cable to the appliance chassis to prevent accidental disconnection.

 

  

Reset Button

In the event that the WARP V3 Appliance needs to be reset, a small pointed object (such as a pen) can be inserted into the hole labeled 'Reset' on rear or the unit. This will activate a momentary switch that performs a hardware reset.

  

LCD Display and Button

A graphic LCD with software-controlled backlight is provided with the appliance. Various software-controlled display features are controlled by a proximity button, which is found on the right-hand side of the LCD display.  Once the power supply is attached to the appliance the backlight of the LCD lights up indicating the unit is powered. 

 

  

Power/Status LED

A bi-colour LED located on the right-hand side of the LCD indicates the appliance is powered and its status.  The colour can be green, red or a blend of both green and red.  For a description of the how the LEDs are used, please refer to the Software  user manual.

  

 

eSATA

   The eSATA port on the rear of the WARP V3 Appliance supports 1.5-Gbps Generation 1 and 3-Gbps Generation 2 speeds.

  

 

USB Port

The USB port on the rear of the WARP V3 Appliance is a USB 2.0 compliant host port and supports high-speed (480MHz) and full-speed (12MHz) operations. It connects directly to the platform controller and is protected by a resettable fuse.

 

 

Ethernet Ports

The two Ethernet ports comply with 10/100/1000 Base-T IEEE 802.3 standards.  The ethernet connections are provided via standard RJ45 jacks.  CAT 5 UTP cable is recommended (CAT 3 UTP can be used for 10Mbps only).

 

 

Audio Line-In and Line-Out

The appliance is outfitted with audio line-in and line-out ports for uses such as music on hold and paging. The ports use the standard 3.5 mm audio jacks found on many commercial devices, such as MP3 players.  Both ports support stereo left and right channels.

 

 

Secure Digital Card Slot
The SD card slot supports only cards that are fully SD compliant, bear the SD logo .  The SD conforms to SD Host Controller Standard Specification Ver1.0.  High capacity (HC) cards are supported.
 
miniPCIe Expansion Connectors

The appliance has two full-size miniPCIe expansion connectors.  They support both PCI Express and USB buses.  The PCI Express bus is Base Specification 1.0a compatible and the USB bus connects to a 2.0 compliant host.  They also support SIM cards with connection to SIM card sockets on the bottom of the carrier PCB.  If any Line Interface Expansion Modules are required in the system, then one of the miniPCIe expansion connectors must be used for a FPGA/DSP module to support the Line Interface Expansion Modules (in this case, the FPGA/DSP module comes from the factory pre-installed in miniPCIe slot 2).  The miniPCIe connectors can support standard full-size 'off-the-shelf' miniPCIe cards.  If a half-size card is to be used then a full-size adapter will need to be attached to the card before it can be installed in the system.


 



Battery

The WARP V3 Appliance contains CR2032 coin cell lithium battery in order to maintain the set time and date.

 

Fan

The internal temperature of the WARP V3 Appliance is controlled by a fan.  Air is drawn in from the left side of the unit and exhausted out the fan at the right hand side of the rear of the unit.  It is important to keep the area around the vents and fan unobstructed.  The speed of the fan is dynamically controlled so the fan may be off when it is not needed.  As the temperature increases inside the unit the fan will gradually turn on and ramp up in speed as required.  As the internal temperature decreases the fan speed ramps down.  


RS-232

The WARP V3 Appliance has an internal RS-232 console connector.  Cables are available from PIKA Technologies.


System Boot

The main boot device is the Secure Digital card, but the system can also boot from USB.  In order to have the system to boot from USB, power down the WARP V3 Appliance, remove the SD card, and power up with a boot-able USB device installed.  From that point on, the system will always boot from USB if there is a USB device installed regardless of whether a SD card is installed or not.  To revert back to booting from the SD card simply power down, remove the USB device, and power up with a boot-able SD card installed.


3.1. Appliance Modules

3.1.1. FXO Module

 

The Analog Trunk/FXO Line Interface Expansion Module provides connectivity to analog central office loop start line analog interfaces.

Typically, a phone is connected to a loop start line from the telephone company and is, by default, in an on-hook state.  When the phone goes off-hook, the phone completes the line circuit and current flows through the line. The telephone company provides an audible dial tone to the phone and accepts dual-tone multi-frequency (DTMF) digits from the caller.

The FXO module is equipped with four FXO ports and a power fail transfer port. If a power failure occurs, the power fail transfer (PFT) port is directly switched to FXO port 1 (adjacent to the PFT port).  If power is restored and the PFT port is in use, port 1 is not disconnected from the PFT port until the phone is hung up on the PFT port.

 

  The loop start analog interface provides the following features:

 

  • Ringing Detection
  • Loop Disconnect Detection
  • Loop Reversal Detection
  • Loop Voltage and Current Monitoring
  • Detects when tip/ring voltage crosses a set voltage when on-hook or off-hook (called DC triggering)
  • Can accommodate private branch exchange (PBX) with 24 V or 48 V battery voltage
  • Voltage detection threshold is software programmable
  • Surge protected
  • Onhook audio reception with or without battery feed
  • Standard RJ11 jacks


3.1.2. FXS Module

 

The Analog Station/FXS module provides connectivity to standard analog phones. Typically, a phone is connected to a station interface and is, by default, in an on-hook state.  When the phone goes off-hook, the phone completes the line circuit and current flows through the line.

The FXS module is equipped with four FXS ports.  There is also one extra RJ11 jack which is not used as shown in Module Labels.


  The analog station interface provides the following features:

 

  • Ringing Generation and Ringing Trip
  • Loop Closure Detection
  • Loop Disconnect
  • Loop Reversal
  • Loop Voltage and Current Monitoring
  • On-hook and Off-hook Transmission
  • Hook-flash Detection
  • DTMF Signaling
  • Programmable Impedance
  • Programmable Audio Gain
  • On-board Power Generation
  • Standard RJ11 jacks


3.1.3. BRI Module

The BRI board provides connectivity to various devices that support basic rate digital interfaces.   The BRI module is offered in 2 and 4 port versions, each port providing a single span 2B+D interface for a total of 4 or 8 channels per module.  Dust covers are inserted into the unused RJ48 jacks on the 2 port version. 

 

The BRI interface provides the following features:

  • 2 or 4 S/T Interfaces (2B+D per interface)
  • TE/NT mode support (software selectable on a per port basis)
  • 100 ohm termination support (software selectable on a per port basis)
  • Point to Point and Point to Multipoint Support (software selecteable on a per port basis)
  • Standard RJ48 jacks (2 unused on 2 port model)
Connector Pinout

 

3.1.4. GSM Module

The GSM module provides connectivity to GSM cellular networks.  The GSM module is offered in 2 and 4 port versions with connectivity to external antennas via standard SMA connectors. 

 

The GSM interface provides the following features:

  • Quad-band radios for worldwide network access
  • Internally accessible SIM cards
  • Support for 1.8V or 3.3V SIM cards
  • SMS messaging
  • External antennas

 

4. Hardware Installation

4.1. Line Interface Expansion Module Installation

Ensure that the appliance is powered off.  You must be grounded with an anti-static wrist strap.  Use a screwdriver to remove the screws on each of the side panels on the appliance.  Remove the top cover.

Remove the knock-out panel on the back of the WARP V3 Appliance as shown.  Press against the panel from the outside of the unit, tilting it downwards to the inside.  Tilt it back and forth until the connection tabs break off.

Before installing the module, remove the screws from the standoff posts with a Phillips #1 screwdriver as shown.

  


The FXO, FXS, BRI, and GSM modules can be inserted into either bay.  If only one module is present, it can be inserted into either bay.  The black module bay connectors are highlighted in the following picture.  Align the module pins with the connector and insert the module into the connector.  To secure the module to the base board by re-installing the screws into the standoffs.

Note: Screws must be used to secure the modules to the base board at all times to provide proper grounding contact.

 


4.1.1. Identifying the modules

The following pictures show the top view of each module to assist in identifying the FXS, FXO, BRI, and GSM modules.


  

FXS, FXO, Dual BRI

 


  

Quad BRI, Dual GSM (new Rev. D), Quad GSM (new Rev. D)


4.1.2. Module Labels

Some of the Line Interface Expansion Modules come with labels to be applied to the rear of the unit for port identification.  Once a module is installed apply the label to the back of the appliance under the ports as shown.


Some GSM, UMTS, and LTE modules ship with a label identifying radio approvals certification numbers which can be applied to the bottom of the Warp as shown.



4.1.3. GSM

4.1.3.1. SIM Card Installation

There are 4 SIM card sockets labeled SIM1, SIM2, SIM3, and SIM4 corresponding to radios 1 through 4.  To install a SIM card, open the SIM socket by sliding the lid in the direction shown on the socket then flip the lid upwards.  Slide the SIM card into the lid then fold the lid back down.  Lock the socket by sliding the lid in the direction shown on the socket.

In the Rev. D of the module the SIM Sockets are located on the top of the module. SIM cards can be installed after the module has been installed in a WARP V3.

Previous Revisions of the module had the SIM Sockets located at the bottom of the module so the SIM cards needed to be installed prior to installing module into a WARP V3.

  


4.1.3.2. GSM Antenna Installation

Each GSM module has standard SMA threaded connectors for connecting to external corded antennas. The GSM module must be connected to indoor antennas only.

Remove the dust covers from the SMA connectors and screw the GSM antenna onto the connector.  Place the antenna in an unobstructed location and as far away from the appliance as possible. If the appliance is installed in a cabinet or rack, ensure that the antenna located outside of the rack.  Ensure that the cable is routed in a manner that it won't get tripped on or get caught on anything.  Since the SMA connectors on the ends of the antenna cables are crimped on, if the cable is pulled it can cause the internal pin to withdraw inside the connector and not make contact to its mating connector.

When looking at the SMA connectors from the rear of the unit, the connector on the right is for GSM radio 1 and the connector on the left is for the last GSM radio.


4.2. Secure Digital Card Installation

 

To install an SD card, ensure that WARP V3 Appliance is powered off, remove the two screws on the bottom of the unit using a Phillips #1 screwdriver and remove the bottom panel.  Install the SD card by sliding it into the slot until it clicks in place as shown.  To remove the SD card, push the card into the socket until it clicks then it can be slid all the way out.

 

When replacing the bottom panel, ensure that the panel that was removed is the same one that is being replaced. This is to ensure that the serial number and MAC address information on the label matches the serial number information that is programmed on the unit.

 

 

  

 

 

4.3. MiniPCIe Module Installation

To install a  miniPCIe module into the system, ensure the WARP V3 Appliance is powered off and ground yourself with an anti-static wrist strap.  Remove the two screws on the bottom of the unit as described in the 'Secure Digital Card Installation' section.  Remove the two side screws near the rear of the unit using a Phillips #1 screwdriver (one on each side).  Remove the top panel and lift the frame of the unit off of the bottom panel.  If installing a miniPCIe module into miniPCIe slot 1, then gently spread the right hand side of the frame and angle the LCD assembly as shown.  Remove the two screws from the standoffs that correspond to the location that the miniPCIe card is being installed.  Insert the miniPCIe card into the miniPCIe connector at a 45 degree angle then tilt the card down to the standoffs and re-install the standoff screws.  Reassemble the unit in the reverse order.


      



For miniPCIe cards with wireless functionality that require an external antenna, there is a punch-out opening provisioned on the rear of the WARP V3 Appliance for an SMA panel mount connector and cable assembly.  Using a pointed object such as a Phillips screwdriver, push out the plastic punch-out where the SMA panel mount connector is to be installed and remove the piece of plastic from the inside and discard.  The SMA connector and cable assembly can now be mounted to the enclosure and the miniPCIe module.

   




If the miniPCIe module comes with additional labels such as approvals marking labels or serial number labels, they should be applied to the bottom of the Warp V3 as shown.




When installing a UMTS module, the antenna should be attached to the connector labeled "Main" as shown. The antenna cable installs by pushing it straight down onto the connector.




When installing a LTE module, the antenna should be attached to the connector labeled "M" as shown. The antenna cable installs by pushing it straight down onto the connector.





For miniPCIe modules that require a SIM card, there are two SIM card sockets on the bottom of the carrier board (one for each miniPCIe slot).  To install SIM cards, remove the two screw from the bottom of the unit and remove the bottom panel.  The two SIM card sockets are labeled 'SIM_CON1' and 'SIM_CON2' and correspond to miniPCIe slots 1 and 2.  Installation of the cards is the same as decribed in the section 'GSM -> SIM Card Installation'.

 

When replacing the bottom panel, ensure that the panel that was removed is the same one that is being replaced. This is to ensure that the serial number information on the label matches the serial number information that is programmed on the unit.

 



4.4. RS-232 Cable Connection

The RS-232 cable which is available through PIKA Technologies has two 0.100" header connectors on it and the one that should be used is the one at the end of the cable.  To connect the cable ensure that the appliance is powered off.  You must be grounded with an anti-static wrist strap.  Remove the two screws on the side of the unit near the rear and remove the lid.  Connect the cable as shown below.  Note: The header is not shrouded so care must be taken to ensure the connectors are not misaligned and is installed with the proper rotation.  The terminal settings are 115200, 8 bit, no parity, 1 stop bit, no flow control.

  

4.5. Battery Replacement

 

To replace the battery, ensure the WARP V3 Appliance is powered off and ground yourself with an anti-static wrist strap.  Remove the top of the unit by removing the two side screws near the rear of the unit.  If there is a Line Interface Expansion Module installed in module 1 location, remove its two hold-down screws and gently rock the module while applying upward pressure in order to remove it.  To remove the battery, press the tab on the side of the socket away from the battery and the battery will pop up.  Install a new CR2032 battery with the positive side facing upwards.  Reassemble the unit in the reverse order.


RISK OF EXPLOSION IF BATTERY IS REPLACED BY AN INCORRECT TYPE. DISPOSE OF USED BATTERIES ACCORDING TO LOCAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS. BATTERY SHOULD BE REPLACED BY SERVICE PERSONNEL.

 

  



5. Technical Specifications

5.1. Base System

ProcessorAtom E620
RAM512MB DDR2 SDRAM
Flash4 Kb
Network2 x 10/100/1000 Base T
USB2.0 host
eSATAGen1, Gen2
Serial InterfaceRS232 (internal header)


5.1.1. Audio Line-In/Out Ports

Input Impedance (Ohms)40K
Output Impedance (Ohms)100
Full Scale Input Voltage (Vrms)1.6
Full Scale Output Voltage (Vrms)1.4

 

5.1.2. Physical Properties

Dimensions (Metric)23.6 cm W x 6.2 cm H x 17.7 cm D
Dimensions (Imperial)9.25" W x 2.5" H x 7" D

         Note: All dimensions are approximate.

 

5.1.3. Power Requirements

Maximum Power Consumption (W)24
Voltage (Vdc)12
PolarityPositive Center
Connector Style5.5mm/2.1mm Barrel

 

5.1.4. Environmental Requirements

Ambient Temperature (degrees C)0 to +45
Storage Temperature (degrees C)-20 to +85
Humidity, non-condensing5% to 95%

 

The unit can only be positioned horizontally with the product label at the bottom, or secured to a wall, with the interface connectors at the bottom. Setting the unit on its side will impede proper ventilation. 

 

Proper system cooling must be ensured to maintain system stability and reliability. All fan and louvre openings on the back and side of the appliance must be kept unobstructed and the ambient temperature must be between 0 and 45 degrees Celsius (32 and 113 degrees Fahrenheit) non-condensing.

 

 

5.2. FXO Module

5.2.1. AC Impedance (in audio band)

 

Off-Hook 
600 ohms 
On-Hook Metallic (Tip to Ring) 
>300 k ohms 
Return Loss 
>26.8 dB 

 

5.2.2. DC Current

 

Loop Current Range 
13 to 110 mA 

 

5.2.3. DC Resistance

 

Longitudinal (tip to ground, ring to ground) 
>9.8 M ohms 
On-Hook Metallic (Tip to Ring) 
>6.5 M ohms 
Off-Hook Metallic (Tip to Ring) 
310 ohms @ 20 mA
117 ohms @ 100 mA 

 

5.2.4. Ringing

 

Ring Detection 
14 Vrms @16 Hz
14 Vrms @20 Hz
12 Vrms @68 Hz 
Ringer Impedance (20 Hz) 
> 26 M ohms 
Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) 
0.1 

 

5.2.5. Gain Tolerance (Linearity)

 

On-hook In (2 to 4 wire) NA 
0.0 to 0.8 dB (300 to 3400 Hz) 
Off-hook In (2 to 4 wire) NA 
-1.5 to -0.4 dB (300 to 3400 Hz) 
Off-hook Out (4 to 2 wire) 
-4.8 to -0.7 dB (300 to 3400 Hz) 

 

5.2.6. Gain Range

 

Fixed - On-hook H/W Gain In (2 to 4 wire) 
-1.6 dB 
Fixed - Off-hook H/W Gain In (2 to 4 wire) 
-0.75 dB 
Fixed - Off-hook H/W Gain Out (4 to 2 wire) 
+0.24 dB 
On-hook Signal overload level @0 dB gain In (2 to 4 wire) 
+4.77 dBm 
Off-hook Signal overload level @0 dB gain In (2 to 4 wire) 
+3.92 dBm 

 

5.2.7. Miscellaneous

 

Trans-hybrid loss (THL) 
>27 dB (300-3400) 
On-hook Common Mode Gain 
-52.9 dBm0 avg. 
Signal to Noise Ratio (15 dBm, 1 kHz reference) 
> 38 dB 
On-Hook Inter Hybrid (Interface) Crosstalk 
No measurable crosstalk 
Off-Hook Inter Hybrid (Interface) Crosstalk 
No measurable crosstalk 
Idle Channel Noise 
6 dBrnc 
Transverse Balance 
> 57 dB 
Supervision 
Ring Detection, Loop Disconnect, Reversal Detection, Loop Voltage, Loop Current 
Signaling 
Off Hook,Flash, DTMF, Pulse Dial 
Onhook Audio Detect 
Caller ID, DTMF, Audio Logging 
Maximum Line Power Dissipation (W/line)1.4 (North America), 2.0 (European Union)

 

 

5.3. FXS Module

5.3.1. AC Impedance (in audio band)

 

Off-hook 
600 ohms or TBR21 complex impedance 
Return Loss 
>30 dB 

 

5.3.2. DC Current

 

Constant Loop Current 
20 mA 

 

5.3.3. Ringing

 

Ringing Amplitude 
45Vrms 
Ringing Frequency 
20 Hz 
DC Bias 
0 V 
Supported Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) 

 

5.3.4. Gain Tolerance (Linearity)

 

On-hook Out (4 to 2 wire) 
+/- 0.5 dB (300 to 3000 Hz) 
Off-hook In (2 to 4 wire) NA 
+/- 0.5 dB (300 to 3000 Hz) 
Off-hook Out (4 to 2 wire) 
+/- 0.5 dB (300 to 3000 Hz) 

 

5.3.5. Gain Range

 

Fixed - On-hook H/W Gain Out (4 to 2 wire) 
+1.2 dB 
Fixed - Off-hook H/W Gain In (2 to 4 wire) 
-3.9 dB 
Fixed - Off-hook H/W Gain Out (4 to 2 wire) 
-3.7 dB 
On-hook Signal Overload Level
(Due to fixed H/W gain, max digital level is +2 dBm0 with 0 dB of digital gain. If maximum PCM transmission level of +3.2 dBm0 is required, digital gain should be set to -1.2 dB.) 
+3.2 dBm 
Off-hook Signal Overload Level 
+7.1 dBm 

 

5.3.6. Miscellaneous

 

Trans-hybrid loss (THL) 
>30 dB (300 to 3400 Hz) 
Signal-to-Noise + Distortion Ratio (signal power from +3.14 to to 30 dBm0) 
> 35.5 dB 
On-hook Inter-Hybrid (Interface) Crosstalk 
> -85 dB 
Off-hook Inter-Hybrid (Interface) Crosstalk 
-92 dB 
Idle Channel Noise 
12 dBrnc 

 

 

5.4. BRI Module (Dual and Quad)

5.4.1. Power Consumption

 

Maximum power consumption 
.96 Watts 

 

5.4.2. Telephony Interface

 

Interfaces 
2 or 4 S/T Interfaces (2B+D per interface) 
TE/NT mode support 
software selectable on a per port basis 
Point to Point and Point to Multi-point Support 
software selectable on a per port basis 
Physical Connector 
4 x RJ45 ( 2 unused on 2 port modules ) 
Impedance 
100 ohm (software selectable on a per port basis) 

 

 

 

5.5. GSM Module (Dual and Quad)

5.5.1. Power Consumption

 

Maximum power consumption 
1 Watt 

 

5.5.2. Antennas

 

Connector 
SMA 
VSWR 
<= 2.0 
Gain 
2.5 dB 
Polarization 
vertical 
Nominal impedance 
50 ohms 

5.5.3. SIM slots

 

  • Support for 1.8V or 3.3V SIM cards

5.6. miniPCIe UMTS Module

5.6.1. Form Factor

Full size miniPCIe card.

51mm x 30mm x 4.7mm

5.6.2. Frequency Bands

WCDMA/HSPA: 2100/1900/900/850MHz

GSM: 1900/1800/900/850MHz

5.7. miniPCIe LTE Module

5.7.1. Form Factor

Full size miniPCIe card.

51mm x 30mm x 3.4mm

5.7.2. Frequency Bands

5.7.2.1. European Market

LTE: B1/B2/B3/B5/B7/B8/B20

HSPA/UMTS: 2100/1900/900/850MHz

GSM: 1900/1800/900/850MHz

 

6. POST

The WARP V3 Appliance performs a Power On Self Test every time it boots.  If there are any hardware or configuration failures which occur during the test the front panel LED will turn red.  Failing codes can be displayed to the LCD by pushing the proximity button on the front panel.  POST codes are also available through software.  Refer to the Software Users Guide for more details.

The following is a list of POST codes:

6.1. POST Codes

LCD Kernel Driver Errors

Error Codes

Description

100

Unable to allocate private structure.

101

misc_register failed.

102

failed to create i2c_client.

103

busy_write_word error failed initialization.

104

Failed to create button detection thread.

105

Failed to initialize the LED’s. [#105]);

 

GSM Kernel Driver Errors

Error Codes

Description

200

FPGA rev <number> is too old. You need at least rev 5041

201

setup_char_devices - device allocation failure

202

Failed to create sysfs for gsm module

203

NO MEMORY to allocate gsm_card module <number>

204

Error - invalid GSM module type should be SIM900 or SIM340

205

UART <number> not valid for the RF <number>

206

Detect zero (0) rf channels valid

207

Number of valid RF's [<number>] does not match what is expected for module rev: <number>

208

Faild to create sysfs for module <number>

209

Faild to create gsm module <number>

210

Unable to request irq <number>

 

 

Analog FXS Kernel Driver Errors

Error Codes

Description

400

Unable to register span with DAHDI device

401

dahdi_register() :Unable to Register

403

Failed to get the operating mode parameters.

404

wa_base.c:dahdi_warp_init_module() error allocating memory

405

Failed DMA initialization

406

wa_base.c:dahdi_warp_init_module() Unable to request irq <number>

407

Failed to enable DMA for this module

 

DMA Errors

Error Codes

Description

600

Failed to allocate memory for tx buffer.

601

No TDM input clock to FPGA.

602

Cannot find midway-mark of DMA list.

603

Slot 0 corrupt with value 0x%X (should have been 0).

604

Failure at ram index 0x<number> loop_count <number>

605

Slot %d (0-63) corrupt with value 0x<number>, expected 0x<number>. rx_frame_counter = <number>

606

Failure at ram index 0x<number> loop_count <number>

607

Host buffer never returns to the beginning.

608

Slot 0 corrupt with value 0x<number> (should have been 0) - loop_count = <number>.

609

Slot #<number> (0-63) corrupt with value 0x<number>, expected 0x<number>.

610

Failure at ram index 0x<number> loop_count <number>

 

EPROM test errors

Error Codes

Description

1500

Serial EPROM failed detection on the I2C bus.

1501

I2C bus access failed.

1502

Failed to access EPROM for CRC validity check.

1503

EPROM CRC check failed.

 

Temperature Sensor Errors

Error Codes

Description

1600

Temperature sensor process not operational.

1601

Core 0 - Missing temperature output value.

1602

Core 0 - Critical temperature detected - actual temp [value] critical warning [value].

1603

SYSTIN - Missing temperature output value.

1604

SYSTIN - High temperature detected - actual temp [value] critical warning [value].

1605

CPUTIN - Missing temperature output value.

1606

CPUTIN - High temperature detected - actual temp [value] critical warning [value].

 

ALSA Errors

Error Codes

Description

1700

ALSA - Failed to detect driver.

1701

ALSA - Failed to determine chip vendor.

1702

ALSA - Query for chip vendor name failed.

1703

ALSA - Failed to determine chip id.

 

GSM Radio Lock Errors

Error Codes

Description

1800

GSM - Could not determine GSM or ZTE lock status.

1801

GSM - GSM channel is locked.

1802

GSM - GSM 3G data module is locked.

 

FPGA Mode Check Error

Error Codes

Description

1900

FPGA image was operating in factory mode. POST attempted a reboot but problem persists.

2000

FPGA image was operating in factory mode. POST attempted a reboot but problem persists. [#2000]

 

 

7. Glossary

Term 
Definition 
dB 
Decibel - A logarithmic unit used to describe a ratio. 
dBm 
An abbreviation for the power ratio in decibel (dB) of the measured power referenced to one milliwatt (mW). 
dBm0 
An abbreviation for the power in dBm measured at a zero transmission level point. 
DDR 
Double Data Rate - A type of signaling that transfers data on both the rising and falling edges of the clock signal. 
DTMF 
Dual Tone Multi-Frequency - Telephone signaling used over the line in the voice-frequency band 
LS 
Loop Start - A method of starting (seizing) a telephone line or trunk by sending a supervisory signal (going off-hook) to the Central Office. With loop start, you seize a line by bridging through a resistance the tip and ring (both wires) of your telephone line. 
CODEC 
Coder/Decoder - Converts analog signals to digital signals. 
CSA 
Canadian Standards Association - An independent organization that establishes and tests safety standards for electronic components and systems for the Canadian marketplace. 
EMC 
ElectroMagnetic Compatibility.- The sensitivity of a system to EMI. 
EMI 
ElectroMagnetic Interference - The interference in signal transmission and reception caused by electrical and magnetic fields. 
FCC 
Federal Communications Commission - The government agency responsible for regulating telecommunications in the United States. 
FPGA 
Field Programmable Gate Array - A semiconductor device containing programmable logic components, called "logic blocks", and programmable interconnects. 
FXO 
Foreign Exchange Office - A telephone signaling interface that receives POTS, or "plain old telephone service". 
FXS 
Foreign Exchange Station - A telephone interface which provides battery power, sends dialtone, and generates ringing voltage. 
IVR 
Interactive Voice Response - A phone technology allowing a telephone caller to select options from a voice menu and interact with the phone system. 
JTAG 
Joint Test Action Group - IEEE 1149.1 standard entitled Standard Test Access Port and Boundary-Scan Architecture for test access ports used for testing printed circuit boards using boundary scan and programming non-volatile storage. 
LCD 
Liquid Crystal Display - A thin, flat display device made up of any number of color or monochrome pixels arrayed in front of a light source or reflector. 
LED 
Light Emitting Diode - A semiconductor diode that emits incoherent narrow-spectrum light. 
LPS 
Limited Power Source - A type of power supply that must limit its current at a given voltage by following a V-I curve provided by Safety regulatory bodies. 
MDI/MDIX 
Medium Dependent Interface - An Ethernet port connection typically used on the Network Interface Card (NIC) or Integrated NIC port on a PC. The X stands for a crossover, where the transmit and receive pairs are swapped. 
MTBF 
Mean Time Between Failure - The estimated average time before a failure occurs in a component. 
NAND 
A type of flash memory based on "not AND" logic gates. 
NOR 
A type of flash memory based on "not OR" logic gates. 
NRTL 
Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory - The U.S. government body that determines if products meet safety standards to provide the assurance these products are safe for use in the workplace. 
Ohm 
The SI unit of electrical impedance or, in the direct current case, electrical resistance. 
PCM 
Pulse Code Modulation - A digital representation of an analog signal used in digital telephone systems. 
PFT 
Power Failure Transfer - In the event of a power failure or a low-voltage battery condition at a subscriber location, a type of port that supplies power to pre-designated subscriber equipment via the central office trunk. 
POST 
Power On Self Test - Pre-boot sequence that identifies and verifies memory, interfaces and devices for booting. 
RAM 
Random Access Memory - A form of integrated circuits that allow the stored data to be accessed in any order. 
REN 
Ringer Equivalency Number - A number that denotes the loading a telephone ringer has on the line. 
RJ 
Registered Jack - RJ are telephone and data jacks registered with the FCC. 
SD 
Secure Digital - A flash (non-volatile) memory card format for use in portable devices. 
SDRAM 
Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory - A type of computer memory that uses a synchronous interface, meaning that it waits for a clock signal before responding to its control inputs. 
SMA 
SubMiniature version A - SMA connectors are coaxial RF connectors for coaxial cable with a screw type coupling mechanism. 
SPI 
Serial Peripheral Interface - A synchronous serial data link standard named by Motorola that operates in full duplex mode. Devices communicate in master/slave mode where the master device initiates the data frame. 
THL 
Trans-hybrid Loss - In a carrier telephone system, the transmission loss at a given frequency measured across a hybrid circuit joined to a given two-wire termination and balancing network. 
USB 
Universal Serial Bus - A standard for providing serial access to interface devices. 
VSWR 
Voltage Standing Wave Ratio - In telecommunications, standing wave ratio (SWR) is the ratio of the amplitude of a partial standing wave at an antinode (maximum) to the amplitude at an adjacent node (minimum), in an electrical transmission line. 
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